THE WORLD’S FIRST SHIP TUNNEL STARTS TO TAKE SHAPE IN NORWAY

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Norway has always been a harbinger of innovations when it comes to shipping exclusively. Ever since the time of the Vikings, improvisations in every aspect of traditional seafaring have been challenged by Norwegians, building engineering processes unseen by the world till that point.

So, when we talk about the world’s first tunnel exclusively for ships, Norway deserves to be the one to see another first in the industry.

Following government approval of startup funds, The Norwegian Coastal Administration (Kystverket) has decided to push forward with an investment of $325 million, completing a 1.7-kilometer tunnel that will be used only by ships.

The tunnel will be so designed that cargo vessels and most ships in the coastal voyage fleet would be able to pass through the same, marking a modern engineering marvel, to say the least.

It will allow vessels to circumvent the tricky waters of Stad, a vulnerable area of the ocean along the Norwegian coastline that has gained a notorious reputation over centuries.

For more than 100 years now, Norwegians have been proposing a tunnel that would help ships in bypassing Stad. The combination of wind, ocean current, and waves makes the stretch of Stad a demanding one for vessels of all sizes.

Legend has it that the Vikings pulled their ships overland to prevent sailing around Stad in bad weather.

The team behind the project—known as the Stad Ship Tunnel, states the challenges ships face while navigating around Stad: “Very high waves come from different directions at the same time and create critical situations for vessels. Heavy seas can also linger for several days after the wind has calmed down, which in turn leads to difficult sailing conditions, even on quiet days.”

Project manager Terje Andreassen explained the next course of action after the project received an initial funding of $8.7 million from the Norwegian government, “We will now start the processes of acquisition of properties in the area where the ship tunnel will be located, as well as put in place a project organization, prepare a tender basis and initiate a tender.”

The ship tunnel is due to open in 2023.

Posted in General by Ankur Kundu on Mar 09, 2021 at 08:37.